Mumbai Rains: Schools, colleges closed, flights cancelled | AIB


The torrential rain hit Mumbai and its outskirts for the second day, prompting a massive interruption in-flight procedures, delaying suburban train services and forcing a large number of people to stay indoors. However, even though the heavy downpour towards the latter half of September came as a surprise, civic services were not as badly hit as the last time.

Schools and colleges in Mumbai metropolitan region were ordered closed given torrential rains, no deaths or significant damage to property are reported.


Air services at the Mumbai terminal were miscued, with 108 flights canceled and extra 51 redirected to nearby airports till this morning due to massive rain and closing of the main runway after a SpiceJet aircraft skidded, overshot the runway and got stuck in the mud, blocking it, an airport official said.

Data from the India Meteorological Department (IMD) explained that over 24 hours, Mumbai recorded about 304 mm of rain, the 312mm standard set for the whole month of September—which means it rained in one day almost as much as it usually does over a month!

The sudden force of this spell was visible from the evidence that it was the second wettest September day in IMD's over 100-year recorded history. "The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has said that owing to climate change we'll keep seeing such torrential rains over short intervals," said Prof Kapil Gupta of IIT, referring to the extreme nature of the phenomenon.


The ongoing spell of torrential downpour accompanied by gusty winds prompted waterlogging in new areas. Not just the usual low-lying areas of Khar and Kalina, even parts of western outskirts such as Dahisar, Marol, and Bandra that unusually report waterlogging were immersed in knee-deep waters.

Vehicular traffic was moving but at a slower pace, including on the Eastern and Western Express Highway, the two major arterial roads in the metropolis.

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