Google Plans To Launch Its Own Ad-Blocker In Chrome | AIB


Google is planning to add an ad-blocking feature in the mobile and desktop versions of its popular Chrome web browser, and this news is from anonymous sources Of The Wall Street Journal.

This decision might sound strange and incongruous, but no, Google has a whole plan behind this strategy, which presumed would benefit their intervention in the digital advertising market, and incidentally, would seek to stop the increase of the third party popular tools, As in the case of Adblock Plus.

According to the report, Google is still thinking about introducing a native ad blocking tool that would arrive with the next Chrome update. This feature would be announced in the coming weeks when it launches in beta and will be focused on, "filtering some types of online ads that are considered to provide bad experiences to consumers while surfing the web."

Google is currently taking the role of consumer protector when deciding what propaganda is fair and what is bad. It has assumed that  Google may choose to automatically block, with the default browser selection, the so-called "unacceptable ads" agreement to the Best Ads Coalition's ranking. These include pop-up ads, auto-play video with sound ads, or countdown timers, as well as those that are considered "below consumer approval thresholds."

This new feature would also have the selection to block all ads. However, it has believed that Google would put some filter so that your ads will not get blocked. This displacement will cause all owners of a web page to have to check that all the ads comply with the rules decreed by Google. Otherwise, they will be in danger of all this advertising being blocked by Chrome automatically.

On the other hand, this tactic has a second reading that is to curb the increase and intervention of third party locking tools, which have grown in a valuable way in recent years. The WSJ understands that in the United States alone, 26 percent of desktop consumers have a tool to block ads.

Here it is significant to consider that Google currently pays Adblock Plus to be part of its programming of "acceptable ads," but apparently, Google now wants to control this so that its free trade is not affected and thus do not have to depend on a third party. According to StatCounter, Chrome has almost 47.5% of the browser market in the United States, so Google search use this location to be the one to dictate the rules, all for its most significant trade that is advertising.

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